Traditional Performing Art and Okinawa’s Pride

Eisa is a traditional event honoring ancestors held during the lunar Bon festival, and nowadays is one of Okinawa’s main traditional performing arts. While its origins are uncertain, one theory holds that it started with a Bud­dhist prayer song from Shonin Taichu, who was a Buddhist priest of the Jodo sect (beginning of the 17th century). Other theories suggest the name “Eisa” comes from the Esaomoro dance in the Omorosaushi collection of old Ryukyu dances, or that it comes from the accompanying chant of “Eisa, Eisa, Hiyaruga Eisa.”

Every year in Okinawa during the lunar Bon festival, groups of youths in different areas perform Eisa dances as they parade along the streets. This is called Michi Junee. Eisa dances take different forms in different areas, and while some use large Odaiko and medium-size Shimedaiko drums, others use small one-sided drums called Paranku, while still others have no drums at all and just use the hands. In recent years there are also increasing numbers of groups performing contemporary Eisa.

Eisa suddenly came into the limelight in 1956, with the holding of the Zento Eisa Competition in Okinawa City. Thereafter this transitioned to the Zento Eisa Festival, which nowadays is a major event held over 3 days and playing host to some 300,000 spectators who are trans— fixed by the majestic splendor of the dance performances.

Traditional Performing Art and Okinawa’s Pride

Eisa is a traditional event honoring ancestors held during the lunar Bon festival, and nowadays is one of Okinawa’s main traditional performing arts. While its origins are uncertain, one theory holds that it started with a Bud­dhist prayer song from Shonin Taichu, who was a Buddhist priest of the Jodo sect (beginning of the 17th century). Other theories suggest the name “Eisa” comes from the Esaomoro dance in the Omorosaushi collection of old Ryukyu dances, or that it comes from the accompanying chant of “Eisa, Eisa, Hiyaruga Eisa.”

Every year in Okinawa during the lunar Bon festival, groups of youths in different areas perform Eisa dances as they parade along the streets. This is called Michi Junee. Eisa dances take different forms in different areas, and while some use large Odaiko and medium-size Shimedaiko drums, others use small one-sided drums called Paranku, while still others have no drums at all and just use the hands. In recent years there are also increasing numbers of groups performing contemporary Eisa.

Eisa suddenly came into the limelight in 1956, with the holding of the Zento Eisa Competition in Okinawa City. Thereafter this transitioned to the Zento Eisa Festival, which nowadays is a major event held over 3 days and playing host to some 300,000 spectators who are trans— fixed by the majestic splendor of the dance performances.

Access

〒900-0004 1-10-9【+Koza MusicTown】 Chuo, Okinawa, Okinawa CheckGooglemap

TEL 098-989-5066

Open Hours 10:00~21:00(Last entrance:20:30)
Closed Wednesday (the following weekday , if Wednesday falls on a holiday) and 31st Dec. to 1st Jan.
Entrance Fee
*Groups of more than 20 people or more
General:\300 (Groups:\250)
Elemantary,junior high school, and senior high school children:\100(Group:\80)
Under elementary school aged children Free
Parking Area Discounts available for those parking in the Koza Music Town parking lot.